Riana Damjanovich

Riana Damjanovich, RN, LSN, IBCLC

Licensed School Nurse 

School Health Coordinator/District Nurse

218-885-1280

ext. 51154

COVID-19 Updates

A letter from your nurse:

Dear Spartan Families,

Welcome to the 2020-2021 school year. My name is Riana Damjanovich and I serve as the District Nurse for Nashwauk-Keewatin Schools. Many of the students call me “Nurse D.” I know that our communities are feeling the impact of COVID-19 and the changes that are happening around us. This is a stressful and ever-changing time for all of us.

If you have questions about available resources or coordination of healthcare services, please email me at rdamjanovich@isd319.org or call me at (218) 885-1280 ext: 51154.

If you feel that you or a loved one are in a crisis, please dial 2-1-1 for assistance regarding essential community services.

If you feel that you or a loved one are suicidal, please text 61222 for assistance.

If you would like to use Telemedicine and speak to a doctor, here are a few options: PlushCareDoctor on DemandOnCare, and MDLive. They are available 24/7. Telemedicine helps to manage ongoing conditions, like depression, diabetes or hypertension; everyday care issues like hair loss or birth control; and urgent care issues, like cold and flu, sinus infections or UTIs.

PlushCare is available at https://plushcare.com/

Doctor on Demand is available at https://www.doctorondemand.com/

MDLive is available at https://www.mdlive.com/

OnCare is available at https://www.oncare.org/

Essentia Health E-Visits are available at https://www.essentiahealth.org/services/e-visit/

Please feel free to reach out if you are unsure about any of the above.

Remember, the best prevention measures for you and your loved ones are to wash your hands often, cover your cough and sneeze into your elbow or tissue, wear a cloth face covering, and stay home as much as possible.

Videos for Students

Handwashing Video for Kids

The Importance of Kids Wearing Masks with Lt. Governor Flanagan and Special Guest

Cloth masks are one of the easiest ways we can limit the spread of COVID-19. And while our littlest Minnesotans are less affected by COVID-19, they can still get sick or spread the virus to others who might be severely impacted. We need everyone five and up to mask up. Parents – start practicing good mask wearing habits with your kiddos this summer so they’re ready for whatever the fall brings. Make it part of your routine to put on a mask any time you head out the door. It’s like tying your shoes or riding a bike – it takes some practice, but it’s best if we all know how to do it safely. Let’s mask up, Minnesota! For up to date information about COVID-19 visit health.mn.gov

COVID 19 Symptoms Chart

Social Distancing What does it mean?

Face Shields

A face shield (a clear plastic barrier that covers the face) is primarily used for eye protection for the person wearing it. At this time, it is not known what level of protection a face shield provides to people nearby from the spray of respiratory droplets from the wearer. There is currently not enough evidence to support the effectiveness of face shields for source control. Therefore, CDC does not currently recommend use of face shields as a substitute for masks.

A face shield allows visibility of facial expressions and lip movements for speech perception and may be used as an alternative to a face covering in the following situations: 

  • Among students in Kindergarten through grade 8, when wearing a face covering is problematic. 

  • By teachers (all grades), when wearing a face covering may impede the educational process. 

  • For staff, students, or visitors who cannot tolerate a face covering due to a developmental, medical, or behavioral health condition. 

  • For staff providing direct support student services, when a face covering impedes the service being provided. 

For optimal protection, the face shield should extend below the chin anteriorly, to the ears laterally, and there should be no exposed gap between the forehead and the shield’s headpiece.

prevent the spread of covid

our school is partnering with Kinsa's Fluency School Health Program this year!

sign up to get a smart thermometer!

Parent Q&A

This year will be a unique year for all students and staff. This will be a year that students and staff will be sent home more than normal. Students will have the opportunity to change to distance learning when sent home to quarantine if they are not too sick to participate.

Your child will be sent home if they have the following:

1. New-onset cough

2. Shortness of breath (trouble breathing)

3. Two of the following: fever (100.4 or higher), chills, muscle pain, sore throat, fatigue, congestion, loss of taste or smell, or stomach symptoms of diarrhea, vomiting, or nausea.

If your child only has one of the symptoms listed above for no known reason, they may be sent home and should talk to their healthcare provider about testing.

Positive COVID test:

  • Stay home for at least 10 days from the day that symptoms started AND until no fever for at least 24 hours without taking medication AND symptoms are improved.

  • Siblings AND household members must stay home for 14 days.

Negative COVID test but have symptoms:

  • Stay home for at least 10 days from the day that symptoms started AND until no fever for at least 24 hours without taking medication AND symptoms are improved.

  • Siblings AND household members must stay home for 14 days.

If you have COVID without a lab test (medical provider diagnosis) OR people with symptoms of COVID without a medical evaluation

  • Stay home for at least 10 days from the day that symptoms started AND until no fever for at least 24 hours without taking medication AND symptoms are improved.

  • Siblings AND household members must stay home for 14 days

If you have a diagnosis of strep, ear infection, or norovirus that explains the symptoms, or when the health care provider says that the symptoms are due to a pre-existing condition, you must stay home until the symptoms have improved.

  • Siblings and household members do not need to stay home.

  • The nurse will follow the Infectious Disease School Manual

Be sure to write down any new symptoms you notice so we have time and date of when they began. Common colds will not be recognized as a common cold, they will be COVID symptoms.

Will my child be tested for COVID at school?

No. If we do mass testing, you would have to sign a consent for your child to receive a test. They will be referred to a healthcare provider for a test.

Will my child be sent home if they only have a fever?

Possibly. If the fever is greater than 100 degrees, we will follow the School Health Manual and send your child home just like other years. The nurse will assess the child to see if they have any other symptoms to determine if it is due to something else such as teething or exercise.

What if a friend was exposed to a positive COVID person and then I was around them?

You would watch for symptoms to see if you develop any along with those that you live with, but you do not need to stay home as that is considered a second person exposure. If you develop symptoms, then you would need to stay home for 10 days and contact your healthcare provider to get tested. Be sure to write down daily who you were around and when or if symptoms started.

When will my child be able to remove his/her mask?

  • When eating or drinking.

  • When communicating with a person who is deaf or hard of hearing or has a disability, medical condition, or mental health condition that makes communication with a face covering difficult.

  • When participating in physical activity or when engaged in other activities (e.g., presenting, performing, or playing an instrument) that would make it difficult or impractical to wear a face covering or face shield. This includes the playground.

  • When receiving a service (e.g., medical, nursing, or personal care services) that are impossible or difficult to perform when the individual receiving the service is wearing a face covering.

  • Staff and children may remove their face covering temporarily when alone, including when alone in an office or other enclosed work area, a room, or a cubicle with walls that are higher than face level when social distancing is maintained

What can I do at home to help stop the spread of COVID and encourage my child to do at school to stay healthy?

  • Stay home if you have any new symptom to see if it gets worse or improves

  • Physically distancing 6 feet apart

  • Wear a mask the way that they are supposed to be worn

  • Get rest and drink water

  • Be aware of any new symptoms you or your child may have

  • If your symptoms get worse, call our healthcare provider

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with your elbow or tissue

  • Wash hands often for 20 seconds

  • Avoid crowds and keep your distance from others (two arm’s length)

  • Avoid sharing personal items with other people especially food and drinks

  • Clean common touch areas like tables, doorknobs, faucets, etc.

Resources:

2020-2021 Planning Guide for Schools

Face Covering Requirements and Recommendations under Executive Order 20-81

CDC Calls On Americans To Wear Masks To Prevent COVID-19 Spread

When You Can Be Around Others After You Had Or Likely Had COVID-19

Toolkit for K-12 Schools

Toolkit for Young Adults: 15 to 21

Early Childhood Screening

Who: Children 3 and 4 years of age

What: Screening in early childhood supports children's readiness for Kindergarten and promotes health and development. Screening includes vision and hearing, height and weight, immunization review, large and small muscles, thinking, language and communication skills as well as social and emotional development. Early Childhood Screening or a comparable comprehensive screening is required for public school Kindergarten entrance.

When: September 25th, 2020

October 23rd, 2020

February 26th, 2021

Please call (218) 885-1280 ext.51154 for an appointment.

Where: Nashwauk Recreation Center

202 4th Street

Nashwauk, MN 55769

(218) 885-3763

Immunizations

Immunizations are important to keep your child and those around them healthy at school. Vaccines are recommended throughout childhood.  Specifically, there are vaccinations required before Kindergarten and prior to entering the 7th and 12th grades. 

If you do not plan to have your child immunized for medical reasons or personal beliefs please submit a notarized conscientious objection form or documentation from your physician indicating medical exemption.

Are Your Kids Ready? Minnesota's Immunization Law

Teens Need Shots Too!

Hearing and Vision Screening

Minnesota Department of Health recommends that all children receive a hearing and vision screening annually from kindergarten through third grade and in grades five, eight, and eleven. If vision or hearing difficulties are detected at screening, you will be notified by the District Nurse.  If you have concerns regarding your child's hearing or vision, please let the District Nurse know.

Helpful Links:

Emoji Illness Guide- When should kids stay home from school?

kids holding letters to spell healthy